Summer Update

Summer is here and the popular cliffs throughout the Park have been busy. The officers and board of the ACC have been working hard on many different fronts to keep reasonable access to many of these popular cliffs. Read some of the recent press at the link below:

https://www.adirondackalmanack.com/2019/06/climbers-coalition-pushes-back-on-high-peaks-parking-restrictions.html

What the Current Route 73 Roadside Parking Closure Means for Climbers:

  • Roadside parking for the Spiders Web is CLOSED! Use the Chapel Pond Outlet Campground just across the road from the approach trail or use any of the legal parking areas around Chapel Pond. If you must cross or walk along the road, please be diligent in watching for traffic!
  • Competition” for parking with hikers has been inadvertently created at the pullouts for Spanky’s Wall, the Beer Walls and the Case Wall. Every weekend since the 2019 closure has been implemented, hikers have been parking in what has traditionally been climber parking. To guarantee parking at these pullouts on the weekends plan on arriving early, typically before 9AM.

Some positive things have been happening within the parking closure area:

  • Registration Kiosks have been added at King Phillips Spring Wall, Spanky’s Wall, Jewels & Gems Cliff, The Upper Washbowl & Creature Wall, The Spider’s Web & Lower Washbowl and The Beer Walls. Please be sure to register every time you visit a cliff! Over time, and in partnership with the DEC, we will learn climber usage patterns which will help us in our charge to be recognized as a relevant user group. Relevant closures, Leave No Trace ethics, and other information will also be posted at these kiosks.
  • Privy’s and Outhouses have been added or repaired at King Phillips Spring Wall, Jewels & Gems Cliff and the Beer Walls. Please use these!
  • The first section of Spider’s Web and Lower Washbowl approach trails have been rerouted.  Please be sure to leave the old section of trail brushed in and use the new, reroute down the grassy berm. It reconnects with the original trail at the foot of the talus field.

Many have noticed and inquired about 2019 trail work days. Unfortunately there is some bureaucratic issues we are working around but be sure to keep your eye out for (hopefully) an autumn trail work event!

As always, please drop us a line if you have questions or concerns regarding all things climbing in the Adirondacks.

Climb safe, climb often and see you out there!

– Will & Allison

2 replies
  1. June
    June says:

    Thanks for your efforts. Not sure if I mentioned this in my previous email to you the left hand anchor clip on Bozeman bullet is pretty badly worn. I know it’s probably a little premature for this because you’re still working with the park but one way to mitigate some erosion at the beer walls would be to have a Rappel route so that or even maybe more than one Rappel route so that people wouldn’t have to walk off all the time. I know this is contrary to how things have always been in the past but it might be time to move forward.

    Reply
    • Allison Rooney
      Allison Rooney says:

      Hi June,

      Thanks for you comments. Unfortunately throughout the Adirondacks there is still a legal gray area between the legitimacy of rock climbing and the legitimacy of fixed anchors. While this is something the ACC is actively working on with the state and other environmental groups, policy changes tend to move glacially slow here. The ADKs are full of aging hardware, much that we know about but some has been overlooked. We appreciate you pointing Bozeman Bullet out to us!

      The ACC is aware that the Beer Walls is in rough shape. It is an area that needs hundreds, possibly thousands, of hours of work to mitigate the years of use and abuse. There is a vague plan for intense overhaul there, including terracing, trail rerouting & hardening, and eventually top anchors at some routes. We want to assure you, and everyone, that the Adirondacks is not “stuck in the past” as is often assumed by visitors but the Coalition is determined to legitimize climbing as a recreational activity in park and work with the state, not against it. We recognize this will be a longer endeavor than doing the work behind the state’s back but ultimately it will be for the benefit of all climber’s and the health of our crags in the future.

      Thanks again for reaching out!

      All the best,
      Allison

      Reply

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